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Product Questions

1) I want to have the T'Blade system installed on my existing ice hockey boot. What size do I need?
2) What size T'Blade Runner/Rocker should I purchase?
3) What is my skate size based on my UK/EURO shoe size?
4) I though T'Blades couldn't be sharpened. How do I use the T'Blade sharpening stone?
5) I see several products with the letters SMU/THG in their description. What does this mean?
6) What is the difference between D, E & EE in skate sizing?
7) What kind of skate will work best for me?
8) How should I install a replacement blade into a shaft?
9) I'm just starting out, what should I look for in terms of what equipment to buy?
10) Will Abec 9 bearings make me skate faster than Abec 5 bearings?

1) I want to have the T'Blade system installed on my existing ice hockey boot. What size do I need?

Concerning the correct holder size, the tblade holder should most likely correspond with the size holder youre currently skating with located on the heel of the plastic holder in raised plastic.

 
2) What size T'Blade Runner/Rocker should I purchase?

Determining the correct rocker & hollow size, most skates that already come equipped with the tblade system are stocked with M/13. This seems to be the standard/middle of the road size. A good rule of thumb to keep in mind is a long rocker will give you better stability; while a short rocker is best for agility. For example a defenseman may prefer a long rocker, while a forward may like skating on a short rocker. Most skaters will start out with a Medium rocker & go on from there.

In regards to the blade hollow, a smaller size (such as 9mm) has a more aggressive edge, that is to say it cuts into the ice more than a larger hollow (15mm or 18mm for example). A larger hollow will give the skater a better glide than a smaller hollow.

Needless to say, personal preference plays a big role in which size will work best for you.

 
3) What is my skate size based on my UK/EURO shoe size?
- A UK 8 shoe size (for example) is typically a US size 9 shoe. Here is a guide to help with shoe size conversion concerning US/UK/EURO sizing:
 
Each skate manufacturer uses different sizing, CCM, RBK, Easton, Bauer and Graf recommended going a size to a size and a half down from your US Mens shoe size. Other brands such as Mission and some Nike skates usually fit equal to US shoe sizing*. We have an approx sizing chart on our site (http://www.hockeymonkey.com/sizingcharts.html) but it is highly recommended to have the skates fitted at a local pro shop before hand, as sizing is NOT guaranteed.

Concerning skate widths, D is the standard, C is about a quarter of an inch narrower than D, while E (or EE depending on the manufacturer) is about a quarter of an inch wider than D. Some skate models may designate N for Narrow/C width, R for Regular/D width and W for Wide/EE width. CCM skates usually have the widest boot construction available, while Nike skates seem to run narrow in general.

*Older model Nikes (Quest 1 & 2) are usually the same as shoe size, to a half size down. Newer model Nike skates (Roller Dads, Shadows, Silvers) are a size, to a size and a half down from your US Mens shoe size.

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4) I though T'Blades couldn't be sharpened. How do I use the T'Blade sharpening stone?

The sharpening stone is used primarily to smooth out the nicks on the side of the blade. To use, please use the guide below.

Hold the stone in your right hand. The flat part should be facing up. Run the stone along the side of the runner, smoothing out the imperfections. If you need further assistance, please call 888.286.6169 or 888.945.4295.

 

5) I see several products with the letters SMU/THG in their description. What does this mean?

SMU stands for "Special Make Up" which is another way to say "limited edition." SMU Products are purchase by The Hockey Group (THG) which HockeyMonkey is a part of. THG is a group of buyers who pool their recourses to purchase in bulk quantities from manufacturers. Often, manufacturers offer an exclusive skate to THG which is very similar (often higher quality) to the model above in cost. Since this SMU model is not mass-produced/marketed & not available most anywhere else, we can offer the skate below what the skate would fetch in the retail market.

For more information, please visit http://www.thehockeygroup.com.

 
6) What is the difference between D, E & EE in skate sizing?

In regards to skate widths, D is the standard, C is about a quarter of an inch narrower than D, while E (or EE depending on the manufacturer) is about a quarter of an inch wider than D. Some skate models may designate N for Narrow/C width, R for Regular/D width and W for Wide/EE width. CCM skates usually have the widest boot construction available, while Nike skates seem to run narrow in general.

 
7) What kind of skate will work best for me?

There are several different variables such as, will you be playing in a league, if so what type, how often will you be on the ice, ect ,ect which unfortunately make it very difficult to determine which skate would work the best according to your needs. Please call Customer service at 888.286.6169/951.271.4159 or contact or Pro Shop @ 888.945.4295/714.210.2976 for a recommendation.

 
8) How should I install a replacement blade into a shaft?

Tools Required: In most pro shops a Multi-Purpose heat gun is used. These can be purchased at a hardware store, usually between $50-$70 US. There are usually two heat settings on your most basic heat guns; its recommended to use the higher of the twomost likely a hair dryer isnt going to work.

Some will use a gas range stove; however this is strongly ill-advised, as there are obvious fire hazards attached to this method.

If extracting a broken blade, you may need a vice of some sort and/or needle-nosed pliers to help you out with the tiny pieces. Sometimes you can drill in a screw through the wood toward the shaft hollow for something to hold onto.

Directions:

  • "Preheat your heat gun. Clamp the blade in a vice so the blade toe is pointing in the air, while the hosel points toward you. Heat the shaft approx. 3 inches from the bottom, where the hosel of the blade slides in. Evenly heat all sides of the shaft to effectively loosen the glue (It usually takes about a minute, sometimes longer depending on how long the blade has been in use).
     

  • "As it the glue heats, it will loosen as well. Continue to apply the heat while simultaneously pulling on the shaft. Slowly the blade will begin to slide away from the shaft. If possible, have one person pull on the shaft, while another continues to heat the blade.
     

  • "Once the blade is out, it's time to install the new blade. Most will come "pre-treated" with dried glue already on to the hosel. It's recommended to add additional glue for more stiffness and stability. Place the new blade in the vice, the same way as the old blade. Heat the glue on the hosel of the blade until it's bubbling a little bit (Do NOT touch the glue! Needless to say it is very hot & can cause mild to sever burns). Ensure the glue is evenly melted on all sides of the hosel, however don't over-heat the glue to the point it's dripping everywhere!
     

  • "Once the glue has been heated on all sides, insert the blade into the shaft slowly, letting the glue harden as you're sliding the replacement blade in. The glue will harden quickly with no heat. You don't need to heat up the shaft again.
     

  • "Wipe away the excess glue that might have been squeezed out (and/or wrap the area were the shaft & hosel join with cloth tape for maximum stiffness) and viola you're done! Please make sure the glue has cooled down completely before use.

    The Fine Print - Please note, this guide is to be used for reference only, HockeyMonkey.com assumes no liability for damaged or un-useable shafts & blades. As always it is best to have blades installed by a professional.

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    9) I'm just starting out, what should I look for in terms of what equipment to buy?

    It can seem overwhelming at times when buying hockey equipment for the first time, so weve provided a list of the gear necessary (and required by most leagues) for play.

    Please be advised, if you have a little extra money to spare, put it towards the helmet and the skates. A helmet is the most important component of your protective equipment. In general, helmets usually last about 2-3 years for kids, and much much longer for adult wearers.
    Concerning skates, there is no other part of your equipment that will have as much of a dramatic effect on your style & performance; a little investment goes a long way.

    *Helmet
    Must be HECC Certified. (For Players under 18, a full shield is required)

    *Mouth Guard
    Higher Quality mouth guards will conforms to the shape of the mouth better, resulting in better comfort.

    * Shoulder Pads
    Protects Chest, Shoulder & Sternum. (Optional for Roller)

    *Elbow Pads
    Protects forearms from slashing, as well as elbows from impact & falls.

    *Hockey Gloves
    Provides protection for the hand & wrist. Higher quality models will give the wearer better flexibility with "split finger" or "three finger" design.

    *Protective Cup/Pelvic Protector

    *Hockey Girdle
    Roller - Provides Hip Tailbone & Thigh protection. Lightweight & Ventilated.
    Ice - Some players will use either a girdle & shell combination, or Ice Hockey Pants. With a Girdle/Shell, you can change the color with a different colored shell, rather then having to purchase a pair of Ice Hockey pants. It's a matter of preference really; however Ice Hockey Pants seem to be more popular.

    *Hockey pants
    Ice - Protects Hips, Tailbone & Thighs. Should be long enough to reach the top of the shin guard. Some brands offer a "short" or "tall" design to suit your preference in pant length.
    Roller - Long shell-type pants to cover your shin guards & girdle (girdle optional).

    *Shin Guards
    Protects your Knee & Shins from sticks, pucks & impact from hitting the boards or ice. Ideally, these should fit an inch or so below the top of the skate boot.

    *Skates
    Affects your skating speed & ability. One of the most important pieces of your equipment, both Ice & Roller.

    *Hockey Stick Most any stick with a stiff non-plastic blade at least 2" wide should work. When Upright, the stick should reach the players nose (with skates on it should reach the bottom of your chin). A defenseman may want to use a longer stick to give them a longer reach for poking the puck away and a forward may want to use a shorter stick to help them stickhandle better.

    Sizing Guides - http://www.hockeymonkey.com/sizingcharts.html

     
    10) Will Abec 9 bearings make me skate faster than Abec 5 bearings?

    ABEC doesnt affect the speed of your skatesnot unless youre skating at extreme speeds (around 330 mph)! ABEC rating is based on a 608 bearing limiting speed of 32,000 rpm. Only in high speed applications such as ultra high speed motors and precision measuring instruments can bearings above ABEC 1 affect performance. Regardless of how fast you plan to go, speed is affected by the choice of lubricant.

    The fit of your wheels and axles have a greater effect on performance than ABEC rating. Wheels and axles have a very loose fit which allows you to press the bearings into the wheel by hand. This virtually erases the benefits of a higher precision bearing by allowing it to slip on the axle or in the wheel. Slippage between the parts results in energy loss. Lost energy = lost speed. The higher the ABEC rating, the less rolling resistance there will be. An ABEC 7 should roll faster than an ABEC 5 by the same vendor. In addition, the higher the rating the softer the metal becomes and the quicker it wears.

     
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